325 Million Years Old Worm Burrows

Another Geological Photo – 325 Million Years Old Worm Burrow Trace Fossils

Casts of Ancient Worm Burrows which are harder than the eroded softer underlying rock.

Casts of Ancient Worm Burrows which are harder than the eroded softer underlying rock.

This rock bed, part of the Lower Limestone Formation at Seafield Castle beach, near Kirkcaldy, is approximately 325 million years old. It shows the casts from burrows of worms, that lived way back in Carboniferous times, in the warm shallow seas surrounding what was then Scotland.

To create the burrow originally, the worm would have secreted a substance to hold together the grains of sand that formed the walls each burrow. Once the sands became buried, and after a process known as the diagenesis of the rocks took place, over a period of millions of years, the burrows have become harder than the underlying rocks, and thus stick out of the underside of the sandstone. These burrows are called ‘trace fossils’ and they can be used to build up an environment of deposition of the rock strata in which they are found.

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