Hill of Tarvit Mansion, near Cupar, Fife

Hill of Tarvit mansion was originally built in 1696 by John Wemyss of Unthank possibly using Sir William Bruce as the architect, and was known as Wemyss House. In 1906, Frederick Sharp, a wealthy businessman from Dundee, bought the house and employed Sir Robert Lorrimer, an architect and designer, to completely rebuild and modernise the front two thirds of the house, to create the ‘Hill of Tarvit’ Mansion.

Hill of Tarvit Mansion - front of house and front terrace

Hill of Tarvit Mansion – front of house and front terrace

Hill of Tarvit Mansion - Main Entrance and driveway

Hill of Tarvit Mansion – Main Entrance and driveway

This amazing house was the ultimate of modern in 1906, with electricity throughout the house, central heating and an internal telephone system. To my mind it’s well worth a visit just to see the upstairs bathroom!! The designer, Sir Robert Lorrimer wasn’t very happy with the final design, and in the porcelain bowl of the toilet, his name is stamped backwards just above the water level – ‘Remirrol’. The bath in this room was also ultra modern for 1906, as it included a built in shower. The tap end of the large free standing bath has semi circular walls, which go right up to the shower head, and must be full of pipes and holes that will create jets of water all over the body of the person showering!!

(Unfortunately, I was unable to take any photos of the interior of the house because I’d forgotten my tripod 😦 and no flash photography is allowed – quite understandably because of all the old books, paintings and tapestries inside Tarvit House)

The rest of the Tarvit House is a time capsule of life for a wealthy Edwardian family in Scotland from 1906 – 1948. A complete inventory of all the items in the house was carried out at some point during this time, so the National Trust for Scotland has been able recreate the house exactly as it was over a hundred years ago.

Below is a selection of photos I took of the gardens and the stable complex, which was built to serve Wemyss House in the early 1800s.

Hill of Tarvit Mansion - Stables

Hill of Tarvit Mansion – Stables – Built in the early 1800s

Hill of Tarvit Mansion - flower garden and main entrance

Hill of Tarvit Mansion – flower garden and main entrance

Hill of Tarvit Mansion - Flower Garden

Hill of Tarvit Mansion – Flower Garden

Hill of Tarvit Mansion - front of house

Hill of Tarvit Mansion – front of house

Hill of Tarvit Mansion - steps to front terrace from lawn

Hill of Tarvit Mansion – steps to front terrace from lawn

The rear of Hill of Tarvit Mansion has been adapted to look like the front of the house, but is in fact part of the original structure built in 1696.

Rear of Hill of Tarvit Mansion from back lawn

Rear of Hill of Tarvit Mansion from back lawn

Rear of Hill of Tarvit Mansion

Rear of Hill of Tarvit Mansion

Hill of Tarvit Mansion - Tea Rooms Garden

Hill of Tarvit Mansion – Tea Rooms Garden

From the back of the house you can walk up into the back lawn, which has a very impressive set of wrought iron gates leading into the woodland and to Tarvit Hill beyond.

Wrought iron gates marking entrance to top garden at Hill of Tarvit Mansion

Wrought iron gates marking entrance to top garden at Hill of Tarvit Mansion

Above, and to the north of the Hill of Tarvit Mansion and gardens, lies the Hill of Tarvit itself. It’s possible to walk to the summit from the gardens, but be advised, it’s quite a sharp incline! But the views from the top are stunning, the summit is marked by a cross, which was built to celebrate Queen Victoria’s diamond jubilee, in 1897.

Our dog and the walk to the summit of Tarvit Hill

Our dog and the walk to the summit of Tarvit Hill

Monument built in 1897 at the summit of Tarvit Hill

Monument built in 1897 at the summit of Tarvit Hill to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee

View towards Cupar from summit of Tarvit Hill

View towards Cupar from summit of Tarvit Hill

View towards St Andrews and North Sea from summit of Tarvit Hill

View towards St Andrews and North Sea from summit of Tarvit Hill

View towards Leven and the Firth of Forth, from summit of Tarvit Hill

View towards Leven and the Firth of Forth, from summit of Tarvit Hill

View towards Lomond Hills from summit of Tarvit Hill

View towards Lomond Hills from summit of Tarvit Hill

For more information on the opening times and entrance fees, see the National Trust for Scotland link below.
http://www.nts.org.uk/Property/Hill-of-Tarvit-Mansion-and-Kingarrock-Hickory-Golf/

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15 thoughts on “Hill of Tarvit Mansion, near Cupar, Fife

    • Thank you Rebecca 🙂 And in answer to your question, no one lives there any more. The mother and father, who bought the house in 1906, had two children, the son was killed in a train crash in 1937, just before he was due to get married. The father had already died (1932) at this point, and the sons mother died in 1946. The youngest daughter unfortunately died of cancer at the age of 38 in 1948, and she left the building and all of it’s artefacts to the National Trust for Scotland. She did insist that the top floor was to be used as a hospice for people suffering from terminal cancer, but in 1977, the Marie Curie Foundation hospice moved to new purpose built facilities, and thus the whole building basically became a museum. The top floor however, was only opened to the public in 2006.

      Liked by 1 person

    • It is an amazing place, I wish I could have taken photos from the inside, it’s brilliant, but unfortunately the National Trust don’t allow it 😦
      My dogs name is Jake, and yes, he’s a handsome wee cocker spaniel. He can be a bit of a pain when I’m out photographing insects and flowers – he comes with me on all my walks, and many an insect he’s frightened off just as I’ve been about to press the shutter!! LOL!! He’s even come up and sat on the flower I’ve been photographing on a few occasions! 😦 But I enjoy the company, so I’m not really complaining! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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