Weekly Photo Challenge – Clothes Pegs, Locks and Ladder

After a ten hour round trip yesterday to Culzean Castle in Ayrshire, which ended up being a complete washout with regards to any photography (my own fault, we took the scenic route down there, and arrived 10 mins after they let the last people in 😦 , next time I’ll go via the motorway!), I’ve decided to post a few more photos for this weeks Daily Post’s, Weekly Photographic Challenge. This week the theme is basically ordinary items that for mostΒ of the time we just take them for granted, but some times they can be seen as (extra)ordinary.

The first three photos are of some wooden clothes pegs on a washing line, I love the texture of the wood and the way the spring mechanism is rusting from all the Scottish rain.

Two more wooden pegs on a washing line

Two more wooden pegs on a washing line

Two wooden pegs on a washing line

Two wooden pegs on a washing line

 

Two wooden pegs on a washing line - Black and White version

Two wooden pegs on a washing line – Black and White

 

The next two images are of an old(ish) pair of padlocks.

The Padlock and Latch

The Padlock and Latch

 

The Padlock

The Padlock

 

The final photo is of a ladder lying in a garden.

The Ladder

The Ladder

 

NB Even though we didn’t get in to see Culzean Castle, I would recommend anyone to visit it, the grounds and the house itself looked amazing, even in the pouring rain just as it was shutting.

Below are three links about the place.

http://www.nts.org.uk/Property/Culzean-Castle-and-Country-Park/

http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/maidens/culzeancastle/

http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/maidens/culzeancountrypark/index.html

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21 thoughts on “Weekly Photo Challenge – Clothes Pegs, Locks and Ladder

  1. Your photos are lovely, the detail you’ve focused on making such ordinary things seem so interesting. I love the rust on the clothes pegs, and the texture of the wood, as you mentioned yourself. The wispy spider’s web on the lock is excellent, too.
    How funny that you should talk about Culzean Castle. I’ve never been there, and didn’t know of its existence until eight years ago, when we bought the house we’re in now. Yes, it was called Culzean – and still is. It took us a while to find out just what the word meant (a man making a delivery from Argos told us!). We keep saying we’ll go and have a look at the castle sometime. Thank you for the useful links. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s amazing Millie, your house must be amazing if it’s anything like Culzean Castle. Did you know that ‘Culzean’ is pronounced ‘Cullane’! And that President Eisenhower may have turned up at your house by mistake, he was given the top floor of the Castle as a thank you present, for the help the Americans gave us during the Second World War πŸ™‚

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      • Ha ha ha. I wish my house did look like Culzean Castle, Andy! Our house isn’t even that old (1989) but we hope to move to somewhere old and cosy in the next couple of years. But unless we win on the lottery (which we don’t even do, so that would be difficult) we won’t ever have a castle. I did know how to pronounce it, though – our friendly Argos delivery man explained all that. I didn’t know about Eisehower owning the top floor. That is interseting. He wouldn’t have been too impressed if he’d turned up here. I think the couple who’d owned our house when it was built had visited Culzean Castle on a holiday. Heaven knows why they called this house after it. πŸ˜€

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      • The couple who owned your house previously obviously had feelings of grandeur about the house! I guess that they really enjoyed a trip to the Castle, hence the name. Like you, we live in a more modern house, personally I wouldn’t mind living in an older house, my terraced cottage in St Just was built in 1840, but I suspect we will remain in this house for a wee while yet. The whole of the ground floor of my cottage would fit in our present living room!!

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      • It’s nice that you have a little cottage as well. I imagine it comes in very handy when you go back down to Cornwall, either to visit people or for a holiday. Still, I think Scotland must be an awesome place to live and you have so many great places to photograph for your blog.

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      • Ah well, that makes sense. There are so many lovely places in Britain. I follow a couple of other bloggers from Cornwall. One still lives there, a very staunch Cornishman. The other one now lives in Australia. I love Cornwall too. It’s quite unique, and still so Celtic in many ways – the place names for a start. (Pen y -whatsits) all over the place. πŸ˜€

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      • As the saying goes ‘By Tre, Pol and Pen, Shall ye know all Cornishmen’ These three words are often the prefixes for many a Cornish name or a place in Cornwall. ‘Tre’ means homestead, ‘Pen’ means headland and ‘Pol’ means pond. Penzance means ‘Holy Headland’ πŸ™‚ And yep, us Cornishmen are very proud of our country!! πŸ™‚

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      • I’ve done quite a study of place-name prefixes, mostly Saxon and Danish but also Celtic ones. It’s all a part of the geography I taught, notably settlement patterns. I’ve had similar conversations about ‘Celtic’ Cornwall with Draliman, who still manitains that Cornwall isn’t (or shouldn’t be) part of England. So, I agree that you Cornishmen are a proud lot! But perhaps the county is just a bit small for independence. πŸ™‚

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      • Cornwall is probably too small for total independence, but I would tend to agree with Draliman, that Cornwall isn’t or shouldn’t be part of England. The Cornish have far more in common with the Gaels, the Bretons, the Welsh and the Irish, than they do with the English. No offence to any one who is English! (My Mum included! Lol!)
        It is fascinating the meanings of all types of placenames, like you said Millie, you can learn so much about the origins of many settlements and towns from their names. At school, I didn’t particularly enjoy ‘human’ geography, but now I find it really fascinating, probably because so much of it is more like history than geography πŸ™‚

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      • Human geography isn’t my thing either, Andy. It’s physical geog. and geology for me. But I did a great course at uni years ago on ‘Historical Geography’. Settlement patterns are all dependent upon the sruface geography of an area which, in turn, is dependent upon underlying geology – with climatic factors thrown in, just to confuse things. Now, I’m sure you really wanted to hear all that waffle at this time of night. πŸ™‚ Nowadays, my love of history equals my love of geography. Funny how we’ve both changed in that respect.

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      • Millie, I enjoy hearing anything geological, with a bit of geography thrown in, at any time of night!!! πŸ™‚ I guess we both are getting more interested in the human side of history, rather than just the purely scientific side of it. You can waffle on to me as much as you want Millie, you won’t ever bore me πŸ™‚

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  2. What a shame that you missed out on Culzean – it looks a fabulous place, but I’m sure you will have another chance. Love those clothes pegs, especially the first one, and the angles made by the spiders’ webs!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Your studies of clothes pegs made me come over all nostalgic. I had old wooden pegs back home and gave them to a friend when we emigrated. Now I have soulless plastic ones.

    I hope you get back to Culzean some time. Although I have not been for almost 30 years, it made a strong and lasting impression on me.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Lovely photos, I especially like the clothes pegs. Sorry to hear about your trip to Culzean, it is a heck of a long way from Fife for a day trip. I went to Culzean a few years ago when I was staying in the south-west and I agree with you that it’s well worth a visit. There’s so much to see, quite apart from the impressive castle.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Lorna πŸ™‚ The clothes pegs are proving quite popular! It was quite a way to go, especially seeing as we went via Edinburgh, to pick up my son from Uni, who then came down too. It was meant to be a birthday treat for me – fortunately I enjoy driving – we were in the car for almost 8 hours!! πŸ™‚

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