Black & White Photos from Pathhead, Kirkcaldy – Part 3

Continuing from my previous 2 posts (Black & White Photos From Pathhead, Kirkcaldy – Part 1 and Part 2), here are the final few photos taken in Kirkcaldy, from the old Nairn Linoleum Works, Kirkcaldy Harbour, and the return up to Pathhead.

The first photo shows the large metal floor supports for part of what was the Nairn Linoleum factory. This area is now an open air car park for the Adam Smith College.

 

Nairn Linoleum Works Roof Supports

Nairn Linoleum Works Roof Supports

 

The second photo shows a couple of small fishing boats in the now almost unused Kirkcaldy Harbour. The harbour is thought to have first been in use as early as the beginning of the 16th century, with boats trading with the Baltic countries, and bringing back grain and continental beers. Shipbuilding also took place here, from the early 1600s. Kirkcaldy Harbour is now used by a few small fishing boats and yachts, and the occasional small grain ship transporting wheat into the nearby Hutchinson’s/Carr’s flour mill, and flour out of the site.

 

Small Fishing Boats in Kirkcaldy Harbour

Small Fishing Boats in Kirkcaldy Harbour

 

The final two black & white photographs show the Pathhead Mid Street Development, three tower blocks built in the mid 1960s, and the final photo shows the tower blocks with the Pathhead Medical Centre in the foreground. This much older building was formerly known as Dunnikier House, and was originally built in 1692 following the marriage of John Watson to Euphan Orrock. A number of monograms of ‘IW’s and ‘EO’s have been recorded in and around the building. (Note – the present Dunnikier House (built in 1790) is now a hotel, and lies on the northern edge of Kirkcaldy). Some alterations were made to the building in 1891, when the house became the Manse for Dunnikier Church, and in 1979, the name was changed to Path House, following restoration by the Fife Health Board, and a change of use to a health centre.

 

Pathhead Mid-Street Development built c1966

Pathhead Mid-Street Development built c1966

 

The Old and The New - Path House(1692) Mid St Development(1966)

The Old and The New – Path House(1692) Mid St Development(1966)

 

 

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38 thoughts on “Black & White Photos from Pathhead, Kirkcaldy – Part 3

    • Thanks Jo 🙂 That’s what struck me as I walked down the hill towards the car park, all those amazingly shaped metal structures sticking out of the wall – I’m guessing the building would have been put up in Late Victorian/Edwardian times, and they certainly knew how to build things in style back then 🙂

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    • That’s true Helen, everything is evolving all of the time, but I still feel it would be good if a few more of the smaller individual industries/businesses still existed – like the independent fisherman etc 🙂

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    • Thanks Su 🙂 Wow………..I can’t say I would fancy swimming in the harbour, I’ve been swimming on the adjacent Ravenscraig beach though. As far as I know, no such event still exists………….no doubt ‘health and safety’ would never allow such a thing anymore 😦

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      • Hehe. I can imagine a mass swim being regarded as a Health and safety nightmare! The last time I was at Repavenscraig, it had “no swimming signs”. That was quite a while ago, and I guess it’s been massively cleaned up since then.

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      • You’re probably right Su, but sometimes they do take the whole ‘Health and Safety’ thing a wee bit far, but a mass swim across a harbour in the middle of winter probably is pushing it a bit nowadays! 🙂
        Ravenscraig has certainly been cleared up, it’s quite a nice beach now, albeit mainly pebbles and very little sand 🙂 I must confess, I wouldn’t have chosen to go swimming at the end of September, but my daughter had gone in, so I had to as well. It was cold enough to shrivel everything to non existence!!!! 😦 Lol!

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      • It’s a shame that “Health & Safety” has got a bit ridiculous — given how important it is to monitor and police public/worker safety generally. When my boy-child was little, we watched a neighbourhood playground (run by the Council) being taken apart and replaced THREE times because the law kept changing and the playground was deemed unsafe! It seems that kids can’t be trusted to climb, swing or generally move around any more. Such a shame.

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  1. Nice scenic tour around Kirkcaldy with these posts, Andy. Interesting that there was active trading with the Baltic countries as well. I would not have imagined that. The black and white gives the photos a nostalgic feel.

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    • You’ve no doubt noticed that I’m going through a bit of a black & white phase at the moment, Amanda, mainly because I feel that certain photos have a much more atmospheric look in B&W 🙂
      It is amazing to think that smallish vessels even as far back as the 1200’s and 1300’s are thought to have crossed the North Sea to trade with the Baltic countries, and the whole of the Fife south coast also had very strong trading links with the Flemish countries, Holland etc, too. This is seen by the building style of many of the older houses in Fife 🙂

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      • This is so interesting, Andy. I am a bit obsessed with Hanseatic countries and the trading that existed then. That is really how I discovered the two types of painting that I like to do. From Norway and the northern areas of Holland…… And I so agree the black and white puts such a feeling into photos. Nostalgic and classic at the same time.

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      • I can’t say I’d noticed your slight obsession with the Hanseatic countries Amanda! LOL!!! 🙂
        But, not this time being sarcastic, I didn’t realise that that style of painting comes from those countries, but I should have guessed! 🙂

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